HANDBOOK OF ACOUSTICS - online book

A complete view of Acoustical Science & its bearings on music, for musicians & music students.

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266                     HAND-BOOK OF ACOUSTICS.
4.  (a) Describe the construction of the principal classes of pipes used in an organ, explaning how each is tuned.
(b) What is the scientific explanation of the effect of mixture stops ? Am. (a) See pp. 99 and 112, for construction; and pp. 100 and 112, for tuning. (6) See p. 109.
5.   (a) State how the pitch of a vibrating string depends on the density, tension, and length of the string.
(b) Explain the application of these laws to the construction, method of tuning, and use of a violin. Am. (a) See p. 87, (4) (3) and (1). {b) See pp. 88, 89, 90.
6.  (a) What are partials or overtones ?
(b) Give the first ten overtones of an open pipe whose funda­mental is—
m
(e) State which of these would differ most markedly from the corresponding notes on an equally tempered pianoforte, and which would agree most nearly.
Am. (a) See p. 84.
n
1
2 3
4
5 6
7
8
9 JO
v
n Jf^
yr
k^
rj
lit) i-J VK-*
VL> ^ CJ
CI
-e-
Z2i
rj
((*;•
"•w-" rj
6 and 10 only represent the pitch approximately.
1, 3, and 7 would agree perfectly.
2 and 5 would agree very nearly.
8 would agree fairly well.
4 and 9 would be T9T comma sharp.
7. A vibrating tuning-fork is held over a tall cylinder, into which water is gradually poured.
(a) Describe and explain the variation that takes place in the sound of the fork.
(J) How could you employ this apparatus to find the velocity of sound, the period of vibration of the fork being given.