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264
THE EOYAL COLLEGE OF OEGANISTS.
1896 and 1897.
1. Write out the harmonic series up to the twelfth harmonic commencing with the following note as the generator.—
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Answer.                                      * j^jfejj^
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* Approximately.
2.    Explain the difference between equal temperament and just temperament.
Am.—This question is wrongly worded; there is no such thing as just temperament, just or true intonation is meant. In true intonation, the relations betwen the tones of the scale are those given on p. 231, middle column. In equal temperament the octave is divided into twelve equal parts, each part forming an equal tempered semitone, two of these semitones forming a tone. Consequently none of the equal tempered intervals, except the octaves, are the same as in true intona­tion. The amount by which these intervals differ from the true intervals is given on pp. 241 and 242.
3.    What is the vibration ratio of a minor tone? State between which degrees of the major diatonic scale a minor tone occurs when tuned according to just temperament.
Am.—Temperament should be intonation. Vibration ratio of a minor tone is y. Between 2nd and 3rd, and 5th and 6th—that is, between r m, and s 1.