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CHORDS.
221
"r1" with both "d1" and "n1"; the first being the more objectionable.
The following are the Distributions of the Major Tetrads within the compass of two Octaves, which contain no Thirteenths or Minor Tenths, and which therefore have no disturbing Differential Tones.
The Most Perfect Distributions of the Major Tetrads within the compass of two octaves.
We see from this, that the tones of a Major chord in its First Inversion or " b" position must lie closely together as in 7; that the tones of a Major chord in the Second Inversion or " c " position must not have a greater compass than an Eleventh, as in 5, 6, and 11; but that to Major chords in their normal position more freedom may be allowed.
With regard to Minor Tetrads, we have already seen that they must have at least one false differential tone. The only Minor Tetrad with but one such Differential is No 1 in the Table below, which has the false differential f and its double octave f2. The remaining Minor Tetrads may contain two, three, or even four disturb­ing differentials. The following Table contains all those within the compass of two Octaves, which generate only two false differentials; such differentials only being shown.